Program & Organizing Committee

Tuesday, 22 March
13:30

Opening & Special Lecture

Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD
Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Japan
14:15

Session 1: Emerging technologies in pluripotent stem cell fields

Cynthia Dunbar, MD, National Institutes of Health, United States

Hiromitsu Nakauchi, MD, PhD, University of Tokyo, Japan

Neville Sanjana, PhD, Broad Institute and MIT, United States

Hirohide Saito, PhD, Center for IPS Cell Research and Application (CIRA), Kyoto University, Japan
17:15

Poster Session I

Wednesday, 23 March
9:00

Session 2: Therapeutic Application I

Luc Douay, MD, PhD University of Pierre and Marie Curie, France

Koji Eto, MD, PhD, Center for IPS Cell Research and Application (CIRA), Kyoto University, Japan

Charles Murry, MD, PhD, University of Washington - Center for Cardiovascular Biology, United States

Masayo Takahashi, MD, PhD, CDB, RIKEN, Japan

Noriyuki Tsumaki, MD, PhD, Center for IPS Cell Research and Application (CIRA), Kyoto University, Japan

14:00

Keynote Lecture I

Austin Smith, PhD, FRS, FRSE, Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, University of Cambridge, UK

14:45

Session 3: Mechanisms of pluripotency

George Q. Daley, MD, PhD, Boston Children's Hospital, United States

Rudolf Jaenisch, PhD, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, United States

Kathrin Plath, PhD, UCLA School of Medicine, United States

Jose Maria Polo, PhD, Monash University, Australia

18:00

Poster Session II

Thursday, 24 March
9:00

Session 4: Therapeutic Application II

Hideyuki Okano, MD, PhD, Keio University, School of Medicine, Japan

Allan Robins, PhD, ViaCyte, United States

Hans-Willem Snoeck, MD, PhD, Columbia Center for Translational Immunology, United States

Jun Takahashi, MD, PhD, Center for IPS Cell Research and Application (CIRA), Kyoto University, Japan

Takanori Takebe, MD, Yokohama City University, Japan and Cincinnati Children's Hospital, United States

14:30

Session 5: Cell differentiation and disease modeling

Andrew G. Elefanty, MB BS, FRAC, PhD, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Australia

Gordon M. Keller, PhD, McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine Ontario Cancer Institute, Canada

Ryuichi Nishinakamura, MD, PhD, Institute of Molecular Embryology & Genetics, Kumamoto University, Japan

17:00

Keynote Lecture II

Richard Young, PhD
Whitehead Biomedical Research Institute, USA
17:45

Closing

Richard Young is a Professor at the Whitehead Institute and MIT. Dr. Young studies gene regulation in health and disease. His honors include Membership in the National Academy of Sciences and Scientific American has recognized him as one of the top 50 leaders in science, technology and business.
Shinya Yamanaka is a professor and the director of the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA) at Kyoto University and a senior investigator at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease in San Francisco. Born in Osaka in 1962, he received a M.D. from Kobe University and a Ph.D. from Osaka City University. After working as a postdoctoral fellow at Gladstone between 1993 and 1996, he took up an assistant professorship at OCU in 1996 and an associate professorship at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology in 1999. Moving to Kyoto University in 2004, he reported in 2006 that his team succeeded in generating Shinya Yamanaka is a professor and the director of the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA) at Kyoto University and a senior investigator at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease in San Francisco. Born in Osaka in 1962, he received a M.D. from Kobe University and a Ph.D. from Osaka City University. After working as a postdoctoral fellow at Gladstone between 1993 and 1996, he took up an assistant professorship at OCU in 1996 and an associate professorship at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology in 1999. Moving to Kyoto University in 2004, he reported in 2006 that his team succeeded in generating induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. For this discovery, Yamanaka received the 2012 Novel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
Noriyuki Tsumaki is currently Professor at the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Japan, where he researches cartilage biology and regeneration of cartilage using cell reprogramming technologies. He earned his M.D. from Osaka University, Japan in 1989. There he completed his Ph.D. in 1996.
Masayo Takahashi M.D., Ph.D. Project leader, Laboratory for Retinal Regeneration Research at RIKEN. As a retina specialist, she aims to better understand macular diseases and retinal hereditary diseases with the ultimate goal of developing novel retinal regeneration therapies.
Jun Takahashi is a professor of Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA) at Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan. He is a neurosurgeon at Kyoto University Hospital, and also doing research works to develop stem cell therapy using iPS cells for Parkinson’s disease.
Dr Robins bio to come
Kathrin Plath, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Biological Chemistry at the David Geffen School of Medicine and the Broad Stem Cell Center at UCLA. The Plath lab focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms that maintain pluripotency and on dissecting the epigenetic changes that are required for differentiation and reprogramming processes.
Dr. Ryuichi Nishinakamura is a professor in the Department of Kidney Development at the Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, Japan. His research focuses on the molecular basis of kidney development, which has led to the creation of three-dimensional kidney tissues from pluripotent stem cells.
After obtaining MD and PhD in Japan, Hiro Nakauchi went to Stanford University for post-doc and isolated CD8 genes. After coming back to Japan, he started working on hematopoietic stem cells in his laboratory in RIKEN. In 1994, he became Professor of Immunology in the University of Tsukuba where he determined the phenotype of mouse hematopoietic stem cells and established an in vivo clonal analysis system. In 2002, he became a Professor of Stem Cell Therapy in the Institute of Medical Science at the University of Tokyo (IMSUT). In 2008, he was appointed as a director of newly established Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in IMSUT. In January 2014, he is starting a new lab at the Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University. Goals of his work are to clarify the mechanism of stem cell self-renewal and to contribute to the cell/gene therapy and regenerative medicine.
Dr Murry bio to come .
Gordon Keller, PhD is a Senior Scientist at the University Health Network’s (UHN) Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Professor at the University of Toronto and Director of UHN’s McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine. His studies are focused on deciphering the cues that direct pluripotent stem cells to make different cell types.
Dr. Jaenisch received his M.D. degree from the University of Munich in 1967. After postdoctoral research at Princeton and the Fox Chase Cancer Center, he first joined the faculty at the Salk Institute and later became Head of the Department of Tumor Virology of the Heinrich-Pette Institute in Hamburg. In 1984 he was recruited as a Founding Member of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The overall focus of Dr. Jaenisch’s research is on epigenetics, reprogramming and stem cell biology.
Dr. Eto was originally clinical physician of cardiovascular medicine. After he started cell biology research at The Scripps Research Institute in 1999, he changed the focus from thrombosis to platelet biology and biogenesis. In 2003, Dr. Eto became an Assistant Professor at Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo. In 2009, he was appointed Associate Professor at The University of Tokyo. He took his current position as a professor at CiRA, Kyoto University in 2011. Dr. Eto earned an MD from Yamanashi University in 1990 and a PhD in 1996. From 1999 to 2003, he was a postdoctoral fellow at The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA.
Andrew Elefanty is group leader of the Blood Cell Development and Disease laboratory at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia. His core interest lies in the regulation of human pluripotent stem cell differentiation to mesoderm and endoderm. He has extensive experience in the genetic modification of PSCs, generating lines into which reporter genes have been inserted by homologous recombination in gene loci that are expressed in specific lineages.
Dr. Dunbar is the Head of the Molecular Hematopoiesis Section within the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the NIH. She is a physician-scientist focusing on hematopoiesis and on the development of novel cell and gene therapies utilizing the non-human primate model.
Luc Douay, MD, PhD is senior Professor of hematology at the University Pierre et Marie Curie, director of the hematology lab of Saint Antoine Hospital, director of Inserm research Unit and scientific director of Paris French Blood Bank (EFS), France. He is a world pioneer and leader in the concept of Red blood Cells generated in vitro from stem cells for transfusion purpose.
George Q. Daley is the Samuel Lux IV Professor of Hematology/Oncology and the Director of the Stem Cell Transplantation Program at Children’s Hospital Boston, Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School, and an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His research entails understanding pathways that influence both stem cell reprogramming and cancer.
Gordon Keller, PhD is a Senior Scientist at the University Health Network’s (UHN) Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Professor at the University of Toronto and Director of UHN’s McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine. His studies are focused on deciphering the cues that direct pluripotent stem cells to make different cell types.
Takanori Takebe received his M.D. in 2011 from Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Japan. He became an associate professor at Yokohama City University and PRESTO, JST investigator in 2013. He now has a joint position as an assistant professor at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center since 2015. His areas of expertise are organoid biology and regenerative medicine.
Dr Neville Sanjana’s research includes pooled screening approaches for functional genomics and genetic models of neurodevelopmental disorders (such as autism) using human neurons derived from pluripotent stem cells. Dr Sanjana is a Simons Postdoctoral Fellow at the Broad Institute and MIT (with Feng Zhang). In April, he will start his own lab at the New York Genome Center as a Core Faculty Member and at NYU as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology and Center for Genomics and Systems Biology. Talented students and postdoctoral fellows interested in genome engineering can contact him about positions in the lab.